Friday, December 2, 2016

You Can't Judge A Book By Its Cover #134

- You can't judge a book by its cover - which is very true. 
 But you can like one cover version better than another....

US cover
UK cover
You see the pattern don't you - I love suspense and thrillers. What caught my eye was a blurb by one of my fave authors - Harlan Coben. And the catchphrase 'Why is everyone talking about the ending of Sarah Pinborough's Behind Her Eyes?' Well, now I need to know! So, the US cover is on the left and the UK cover is on the right. The first thing I noticed is that the US has eyes open and the UK is eyes closed. Snippet of a woman's face on the US, more on the UK. And colour and lack of. The UK cover is a little more lurid than the US, but in terms of picking either up to read more on the flyleaf, I would be more inclined to pick up the UK cover - my choice this week. What about you? Which cover do you prefer? Any plans to read Behind Her Eyes? You Can't Judge A Book By Its Cover is a regular feature at A Bookworm's World. ? 

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Over the Counter #342

What books caught my eye this week as they passed over the library counter and under my scanner? This week its animals that help - and need help.

First up is Pets on the Couch: Neurotic Dogs, Compulsive Cats, Anxious Birds, and the New Science of Animal Psychiatry by Nicholas Dodman.

From the publisher, Atria Books:

The pioneering veterinarian and author of the New York Times bestseller, The Dog Who Loved Too Much, and the national bestseller, The Cat Who Cried for Help, recounts his uniquely entertaining—and poignant—stories of treating animals for all-too-human problems as he reveals his amazing breakthroughs with the new science of One Medicine.

The Oliver Sacks of animal brains, Dr. Nicholas Dodman is an internationally renowned veterinarian and research scientist who wrote one of the first popular books to recognize the complex emotional lives of dogs and to reveal innovative ways to help them, including with Puppy Prozac. Now, Dr. Dodman once again breaks new ground with the practice of One Medicine, the profound recognition that humans and other animals share the same neurochemistry, and that our minds and emotions work in similar ways.

Racehorses with Tourette’s Syndrome, spinning dogs with epilepsy, cats with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, feather-plucking parrots with anxiety, and a diffident Bull Terrier with autism—these astonishing cases were all helped by One Medicine, which emphasizes the similarities rather than differences between animals and humans.

Inspiring, sometimes heartbreaking, and utterly fascinating, Pets on the Couch demonstrates how what we share with our animals can only lead us to a greater appreciation for them—and our mutual bonds."

Next up is The Killer Whale Who Changed the World  by  Mark Leiren-Young.                                                                       

From the publisher, Greystone Books:

"The fascinating and heartbreaking account of the first publicly exhibited captive killer whale―a story that forever changed the way we see orcas and sparked the movement to save them.

Killer whales had always been seen as bloodthirsty sea monsters. That all changed when a young killer whale was captured off the west coast of North America and displayed to the public in 1964. Moby Doll―as the whale became known―was an instant celebrity, drawing twenty thousand visitors on the one and only day he was exhibited. He died within a few months, but his famous gentleness sparked a worldwide crusade that transformed how people understood and appreciated orcas. Because of Moby Doll, we stopped fearing “killers” and grew to love and respect “orcas."

(Over the Counter is a regular feature at A Bookworm's World. I've sadly come the realization that I cannot physically read every book that catches my interest as it crosses over my counter at the library. But... I can mention them and maybe one of them will catch your eye as well. See if your local library has them on their shelves!) 

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Where are the reviews Luanne?

Yes, they've been a bit spotty over the last week and a half. I was a little busy - I spent Thanksgiving with this little guy! 

Things will be back to normal next week!


Monday, November 28, 2016

A Great Reckoning - Louise Penny

I am a huge fan of Louise Penny and her Inspector Gamache series. I've read or listened to them all. The latest (and number twelve) in the series is A Great Reckoning. I chose to listen to it as well.

Now, having expressed that I am a diehard fan, I must admit that the last few books have not been my favourites. I found them distinctly slower paced following on the heels of the long building Sûreté corruption scandal. With a resolution in hand, Gamache has retired and permanently moved to the quaint and quirky town of Three Pines.

Penny combines the best of both worlds in this latest offering. A map is found in the walls of the Three Pines bistro. It's an odd, old map, but is definitely depicting the village of Three Pines. But the village does not appear on any current maps and unless you know it's there, you would not be able to find it. Why is that? And what is the old map pointing to? But retirement hasn't lasted long for Gamache. He has again taken up the challenge of ridding the Sûreté of corruption - this time in the cadet training college.

Penny's plotting is at the top of her game in A Great Reckoning. Gamache has an intricate plan to rid the college of corruption. But there are those plotting just as hard against his actions. When a professor is killed, the stakes are raised for everyone.....

What can I say about this series? It's absolutely wonderful - I love all of  the characters. I've become invested in not only Gamache, but the residents of the village and their personal lives. It's hard to pick a favourite - but I am drawn to the grumpy old poet Ruth. She has hidden depths behind the façade she presents to the world. And darn it, I would love to live in Three Pines! As I said, the plotting is intricate and intriguing and incredibly well played. I truly had no idea where Penny was going with this latest.

When Ralph Cosham died (he embodied Gamache for me) I wondered if I could get used to the new reader. And the answer is yes, I have. Robert Bathurst has a lovely rich voice with an English accent, but he handles the French words and accent very well. His tones are modulated, again embodying Gamache's character. (He rarely raises his voice) He's easy to understand. He also provides different voices for the large supporting cast. I particularly like his voice for Ruth and her duck.

Just an excellent listen and I'm so looking forward to the next in this series. Listen to an excerpt. Or if you prefer, read an excerpt of A Great Reckoning.

Friday, November 25, 2016

You Can't Judge A Book By Its Cover # 133

- You can't judge a book by its cover - which is very true. 
 But you can like one cover version better than another....

US cover
UK cover
Peter Swanson's books are absolutely fantastic. I am eagerly awaiting the release of his newest, Her Every Fear, in January '17. The US cover is on the left and the UK cover is on the right. The premise sounds great - a young woman borrows her cousin's apartment. And then a young woman in a neighbouring apt. is found murdered. " An electrifying and downright Hitchcockian psychological thriller." I'm sold. So, on to the covers. The UK cover is darker and gives us the idea that something has been seen through a window. And we have a woman peeking out. Afraid I would assume. The US has a lighter feel, with more 'apartments' represented. The open curtains also give the idea that something has been seen. But in this case, its a man at the window, partially hidden. Hmm, I'm going to go with the US cover this week. What about you? Which cover do you prefer? Any plans to read Her Every Fear? You Can't Judge A Book By Its Cover is a regular feature at A Bookworm's World. 

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Giveaway - How Will I Know You - Jessica Treadway

Jessica Treadway's new novel - How Will I Know You? - releases December 6/16. And I have two copies to giveaway to two lucky readers!

From Grand Central Publishing:

"A page-turner about the murder of a teenage girl, from the author of Lacy Eye.

On a cold December day in northern upstate New York, the body of high school senior Joy Enright is discovered in the woods at the edge of a pond. She had been presumed drowned, but an autopsy shows that she was, in fact, strangled. As the investigation unfolds, four characters tell the story from widely divergent perspectives: Susanne, Joy's mother and a professor at the local art college; Martin, a black graduate student suspected of the murder; Harper, Joy's best friend and a potential eyewitness; and Tom, a rescue diver and son-in-law of the town's police chief. As a web of small-town secrets comes to light, a dramatic conclusion reveals the truth about Joy's death." Read an excerpt of How Will I Know You?


"Jessica Treadway is the author of Lacy Eye, And Give You Peace, and two story collections, Absent Without Leave and Other Stories and Please Come Back to Me, which received the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. A professor at Emerson College in Boston, she lives with her husband in Lexington, Massachusetts."
You can connect with Jessica Treadway on her website.

Sound like a book you'd like to read? Use the Rafflecopter form below to enter for a chance to win one of two copies available. Open to US and Canada, no po boxes please. Ends Dec. 3/16.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Over the Counter # 341

What books caught my eye this week as they passed over the library counter and under my scanner? This week it's books spawned by television.....

First up is Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong.

From the publisher, Simon and Schuster:

"The hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld—the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world, altering the lives of everyone it touched.

Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly forty million Americans were tuning in weekly.

In Seinfeldia, acclaimed TV historian and entertainment writer Jennifer Keishin Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!”, Joe Davola gets questioned every day about his sanity, Kenny Kramer makes his living giving tours of New York sights from the show, and fans dress up in Jerry’s famous puffy shirt, dance like Elaine, and imagine plotlines for Seinfeld if it were still on TV."

Next up is The Science of TV's The Big Bang Theory : Explanations Even Penny Would Understand by Dave Zobel.

From the publisher, ECW Press:

"The highest-rated scripted show on TV, The Big Bang Theory often features Sheldon, Howard, Leonard, and Raj wisecracking about scientific principles as if Penny and the rest of us should know exactly what they’re talking about.

The Science of TV’s The Big Bang Theory lets all of us in on the punchline by breaking down the show’s scientific conversations. From an explanation of why Sheldon would think 73 is the best number, to an experiment involving the physical stature of Wolowitz women, to an argument refuting Sheldon’s assertion that engineers are the Oompa-Loompas of science, author Dave Zobel maintains a humorous and informative approach and gives readers enough knowledge to make them welcome on Sheldon’s couch."

(Over the Counter is a regular feature at A Bookworm's World. I've sadly come the realization that I cannot physically read every book that catches my interest as it crosses over my counter at the library. But... I can mention them and maybe one of them will catch your eye as well. See if your local library has them on their shelves!)